Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Housewives make their men healthy and wealthy

Here's an interesting article:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/3320392/Housewives-make-their-men-healthy-and-wealthy.html

What do you think?

5 comments:

  1. Hi RH, I just recently discovered your blog and have been reading through the many posts. I, too am a childless homemaker (not by choice!), but up until five years ago I was working fulltime outside the home. My husband would often make remarks about how I was always putting my job before him (& his needs). He does not like doing any household chores at all (except outside work), so many times after working long hours and being stressed and exhausted our I would spend the majority of the first half of the weekend just getting things caught up, shopping, etc. The five years I have been home have seemed to work well so far. I don't tell people that I am a homemaker because I do the bookkeeping (part-time) for my husband's business and he works from home. The rest of my time is spent "homemaking" and hobbies. Recently, though I have become a little depressed mainly because of the feelings of isolation. I am not an extrovert but not an introvert either. I enjoy alone time but I also need to be with other people. The alone time in the house also reminds me that I wanted to fill it with children and I've really had to re-program my thinking that it is OK to be a homemaker without kids. My husband enjoys my company and help with the business and he is spoiled now, too. I am tempted to get a part-time job just to get out of the house some more and maybe make some new friends. How do you deal with the feelings of loneliness and isolation?

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  2. Hi RH, I have recently found your blog and I've been encouraged by your posts and follower comments. I, too am a childless homemaker (not by choice!) I don't call myself a homemaker because I do work as a part-time bookkeeper for my husband's business from home. Up until five years ago, I was a full-time working professional and my husband would make comments that my work was always put before him. He is not the type to do any household chores or shopping so even after working many long hours, I still had the laundry, shopping and cooking to do. Even without children in the home these tasks take a lot of time and effort. I would come home stressed and exhausted and didn't even like my job. Lately though, I have become depressed thinking about the loneliness and isolation of being home alone much of the day. I have plenty to keep me busy, but being alone is taking a toll on me. Yes, my husband also works from home so he is here, but I miss the work friendships I had and I have not met any childless homemakers in my area. We must be a very rare species indeed these days. How do you deal with the feelings of isolation? Thanks for your blog. I have so enjoyed reading the posts!

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  3. Hi Anonymous! Do you have any family members living close by or even friends that are not homemakers? I know it can get lonely at times!

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  4. I resented the last statement of the article. "Duindam and Spruijt argue that the Government should motivate men to look after themselves and others better." Do the social engineers ever stop? Men are not made to be nurturing. It is just not in their DNA. If a man becomes a nurturer then he has then become a women. This whole push that the feminist have to make women men and men women is so dumb. Why can't the public see though this. Let women be women and men be men. I know the whole point is that a housewife benefits her husband, the bible says so and it is true. Married men with GOOD housewifes are healthier, wealthier and happier.

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